How to build a real energy revolution in Africa

The lifestyle of the people in Africa is very different from any country in the whole world and the reasons behind that are wars, no knowledge of how use the natural resources and no technology. There are some people who were capable to pay in cash and health to use diesel generators, kerosene lamps and charcoal fires and some of them are completely off-grid which are approximately 600 million people beside nearly 70% of the sub-Saharan African population doesn’t have electricity. Instead of unhealthy and smoke-belching products the Africans had seen a wealth of stories about entrepreneurs who promise clever solutions. If they all agree the replacements might make a difference: be too expensive to be practical and Installing actual electricity infrastructure in Africa would take too long. To serve only one single use and certainly well-meaning instead of that there was a focus on products that, while often very smart and it talk about bike-powered mobile phone chargers, solar-powered lamps, “pot-in-pot” refrigerators. I’m not the only one who think that people in Africa and westerners would not find a grate between each other or they would not bear the idea of people who in different continent should make do with an inferior solution. There is no replacement power for a standard AC-current plug but the cleverest is the solar lightbulb in the world. Sam Slaughter he is the co-founder of energy generator whose company wants to install “microgrids” across the continent and it’s a small local versions of the traditional electricity grid beside it is instead of Pot-in-pot refrigerators and bicycles will not generate enough power to support any form of manufacturing or production.

New learned words

  • Charcoal:Definition: A drawing pencil of charcoal.
    1. Example: Put several pieces of activated charcoal on a paper towel and set it in the middle of the room.
    2. Part of speech: Noun.
  • Grid:Definition: A network of horizontal and perpendicular lines, uniformly spaced, for locating points on a map, chart, or aerial photograph by means of a system of coordinates.
    1. Example: Navigating the grid of city streets seems nightmarish.
    2. Part of speech: Noun.
  • Belching:Definition: To eject gas spasmodically and noisily from the stomach through the mouth; eruct.
    1. Example: Fire and smoke belched from the dragon’s mouth.
    2. Part of speech: Verb.
  • Entrepreneurs:Definition: A person who organizes and manages any enterprise, especially a business, usually with considerable initiative and risk.
    1. Example: Entrepreneurs boost the economy by exploiting new ideas and business models in order to turn a profit.
    2. Part of speech: Noun.
  • Standard:Definition: An object that is regarded as the usual or most common size or form of its kind 
    1. Example: His work this week hasn’t been up to his usual standard.
    2. Part of speech: Noun.
  • Grate:Definition: To have an irritating or unpleasant effect.
    1. Example: His constant chatter grates on my nerves.
    2. Part of speech: Verb.
  • Inferior:Definition: Lower in place or position; closer to the bottom or base.
    1. Example: Descending into the inferior regions of the earth.
    2. Part of speech: Adjective.
  • Microgrids:Definition: A device which can generate power.
    1. Example: A company who installed a traditional electricity grid called “Microgrid”.
    2. Part of speech: Noun.
  • Manufacture:Definition: The making of goods or wares by manual labor or by machinery, especially on a large scale.
    1. Example: The manufacture of television sets.
    2. Part of speech: Noun.
  • Kerosene:Definition: A mixture of liquid hydrocarbons obtained by distilling petroleum, bituminous shale, or the like, and widely used as a fuel, cleaning solvent, etc. 
  1. Example: A kerosene lamp.
  2. Part of speech: Noun.

http://ideas.ted.com/how-to-build-a-real-energy-revolution-in-africa/

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